Effect of learning environment on child arithmetic skills

Reading decoding phonetic and irregularsound-symbol knowledge and spelling. Each can be used independently.

Effect of learning environment on child arithmetic skills

Introduction

Perkins Imagine that we have the opportunity to observe two classrooms where the teachers are discussing the Boston Tea Party. Both teachers have been integrating certain ideas across several subject matters, but they do not have the same agenda.

In classroom A, the teacher highlights an integrative theme mentioned earlier in this book, dependence and independence. The students have already read the history of the Boston Tea Party. To foster collaborative learning, the teacher divides the class into groups of two or three.

The students set out to diagram some of the intricacies behind the Boston Tea Party. For example, the Boston tea sellers were not entirely dependent on British tea; there was a thriving black market in Dutch tea. This time, I want you to highlight relationships of dependency.

Who depends on whom, how much, and in what ways? A distinction was promised between content and skills integration, yet the two teachers seem to be doing essentially the same thing. In both classrooms A and B, the students are working in groups, making diagrams, and highlighting dependency relationships.

Where, then, lies the difference? The difference cannot be seen clearly in one lesson on one topic. However, if we look across several lessons in different subjects, we begin to see the essence of two contrasting attempts at integration across the curriculum.

In classroom A, the approach is thematic: In another lesson, an introduction to the concept of ecology, the teacher involves the students in discussing not concept mapping patterns of dependence and independence in the food web. In exploring a short story about a child who runs away from home, the students make up additional episodes for the story, showing how the child just shifts his dependencies rather than become independent.

However, in classroom B, where the students also study ecology and read the story about the boy who ran away, matters play out differently.

Effect of learning environment on child arithmetic skills

As part of their ecology unit, the students make a concept map of the ecological system of a pond: They highlight cause-and-effect relationships and predict the behavior of the system over time. After the students read the short story, the teacher asks them to prepare concept maps of the problems the child faces upon running away from home: These examples illustrate the difference between content-oriented integration and skill-oriented integration.

In this chapter, we focus on the potentials of integrating thinking and learning skills across the curriculum. When, how, and why might we cultivate such an approach to integration? What are its promises and its pitfalls? Contrasting Visions In its broadest sense curriculum integration embraces not just the interweaving of subjects e.

While virtually all educators agree that students ought to acquire both skills needed to acquire knowledge and some knowledge itself, there is nowhere near unanimity on how instruction aiming toward these complementary sets of goals should be organized.

But there are many obstacles to systematic skills-content integration. To bring these issues to the fore, it is helpful to contrast a standard view of the relationship between skills and content and a futuristic alternative.

What is most striking in the prevailing approach to skills and content is the dichotomy between elementary and secondary education. The skill teaching orientation is so pervasive that it engulfs whatever it comes in contact with.

Thus, basal readers run students through a gauntlet of literature skills in addition to regular reading skills, social studies emphasizes map skills, and proponents of higher-level thinking see their elevated visions transformed into still more skills lists.

Proponents of teaching reading and writing skills across the elementary curriculum receive a mixed reaction. On the one hand, there is a positive response, since endorsement is being given for doing more of what most elementary teachers are disposed to do anyway, which is to teach language arts.

In the secondary schools, subject matter content dominates, and the prevailing assumption is that students have already learned basic skills. Skill-deficient students are assumed to need remedial help.

More advanced instruction in reading and especially writing are assumed to be the province of English teachers. In their English classes, however, students actually are instructed in and practice reading literature and writing in a literary vein.

Proponents of reading and writing in the content areas often are rejected because of unwillingness to sacrifice any amount of subject matter coverage.The main aim of this experiment is to find out whether learning environments will affect children’s arithmetic skills.

The hypothesis is children in kindergarten will performed better in arithmetic skills than children receiving home-schooling (N=40).

Hello Everyone, Greetings and hope you travelved well back home. Like I mentioned during E-Learning & Digital Culture Class at the residentials, I have prepered an Evaluation Survey for this course. Search using a saved search preference or by selecting one or more content areas and grade levels to view standards, related Eligible .

The Syndrome of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: Clinical Description and Applied Aspects Michael A. Roman The University of Texas. Abstract The syndrome of nonverbal learning disabilities is now well recognized in the field of neuropsychology.

At our educational website, we have hundreds of free, online, learning games for kids. But anyone interested in online learning can use our site -. Early childhood development is the key to a full and productive life for a child and to the progress of a nation.

Early childhood is a critical stage of development.

How Environmental Factors Affects our Learning Process?